Here’s how the article starts….

There is a joyful corner of the internet where people don’t argue, trolls don’t troll, and the only kind of self-consciousness is an exploration of consciousness itself: the review sections of marijuana websites, where users of all stripes write eclectic assessments of their favorite weed strains. These reviews contain entire worlds of humor, honesty, pathos, and narrative. They read like the most captivating and confessional short stories, and sometimes—if you’re lucky—the reviewer becomes more vivid than a fully-realized literary character. All at once, you might find yourself sitting on his or her couch as smoke curls from a bong.

“My first time smoking this strain was yesterday and after a few hits I still wasn’t feeling anything. So I did what all amateurs do and assumed it was weak so I hit it more,” writes user bwool in a five-star Leafly.com review of King Louis XIII, a strong indica known for its high THC percentages. Already, bwool has deftly given us exposition and rising action, the first two elements of Freytag’s pyramid of dramatic structure. We brace ourselves for the calamity of the reviewer’s ascension, delivered with a perfect combination of sincerity and stoner mythos:

About five minutes later I was literally having a conversation with my cat about how jealous she had been getting of all the attention my dog was getting from the family. For a while I was almost hallucinating as I talked with inanimate objects and then saw and felt the presence of people from the future I think.

What I love most about cannabis reviews is this mixture of awe and nonchalance. Bwool suggests she has just transcended the corporeal and temporal world by encountering “people from the future.” And yet, she dismisses this absurd pronouncement with a casual wave of the hand, adding I think, as if she’s merely told us in passing that she may or may not have seen a mutual friend at Rite Aid.

Read on at …https://lithub.com/the-unexpected-literary-pleasure-of-marijuana-reviews/