We stand at a hazy junction in cannabis business history.

Some Big Weed companies are so “eager to shake off the image of being high-end drug dealers,” as the New York Times recently put it, that their CEOs won’t even cop to sampling their own products. But others in the industry—including six CEOs who spoke to Quartz at Work—will gladly tell you how and why they consume cannabis products, sometimes at the office, perhaps multiple times per day.

The latter bunch are not being reckless with their corporate reputations. They run small to medium-sized companies in one of 11 US states, or in the capital district, where recreational marijuana is legal and cannabis is routinely compared to everyday “drugs” like caffeine or alcohol. As representatives of the modern cannabis sector, touting health and wellness, they’re eager to cast cannabis as a normal aid in daily life, including life at work.

We asked for the details of their habits, hoping to get a sense of how and why people might use cannabis in the workplace. Their answers are below. But first, a couple of caveats.

The CEOs we spoke to all stressed that people respond differently to marijuana, so their own experiences with cannabis shouldn’t be read as a claim or promise of what a product can do for you or for a particular health concern. Secondly, many of the people we spoke to are CBD believers, even though studies can’t really prove either way that this non-psychoactive chemical compound in cannabis (CBD stands for cannabidiol) has any of the benefits ascribed to it. For that matter, we also don’t know with certainty whether THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the main active ingredient in marijuana, which is intoxicating, can work all the magic that’s attributed to it, like heightened creativity. Scientific studies are still catching up with all of this.

Finally, we’re likewise waiting for science to explain the vaping-related lung illnesses and deaths that have been reported across the US since late summer. Officials in several states have issued advisories urging people not to vape at all, even with legal cannabis products. Nevertheless, a few of our interviewees say they continue to vape, feeling safe about the quality of the products they’re buying; they argue that the crisis illustrates why cannabis should be legalized federally and therefore regulated and inspected.

“I use cannabis specifically to treat ADD.”

Max Simon, CEO of Green Flower, a California-based cannabis education and training platform, says he’s a daily consumer of the plant’s extract. Every morning before work and again right after lunch, he takes 3-5 mg of a pure THC tincture that also contains MCT (medium chain triglycerides) oil, and he microdoses with tinctures throughout the day.

The latter bunch are not being reckless with their corporate reputations. They run small to medium-sized companies in one of 11 US states, or in the capital district, where recreational marijuana is legal and cannabis is routinely compared to everyday “drugs” like caffeine or alcohol. As representatives of the modern cannabis sector, touting health and wellness, they’re eager to cast cannabis as a normal aid in daily life, including life at work.

We asked for the details of their habits, hoping to get a sense of how and why people might use cannabis in the workplace. Their answers are below. But first, a couple of caveats.

The CEOs we spoke to all stressed that people respond differently to marijuana, so their own experiences with cannabis shouldn’t be read as a claim or promise of what a product can do for you or for a particular health concern. Secondly, many of the people we spoke to are CBD believers, even though studies can’t really prove either way that this non-psychoactive chemical compound in cannabis (CBD stands for cannabidiol) has any of the benefits ascribed to it. For that matter, we also don’t know with certainty whether THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the main active ingredient in marijuana, which is intoxicating, can work all the magic that’s attributed to it, like heightened creativity. Scientific studies are still catching up with all of this.

Finally, we’re likewise waiting for science to explain the vaping-related lung illnesses and deaths that have been reported across the US since late summer. Officials in several states have issued advisories urging people not to vape at all, even with legal cannabis products. Nevertheless, a few of our interviewees say they continue to vape, feeling safe about the quality of the products they’re buying; they argue that the crisis illustrates why cannabis should be legalized federally and therefore regulated and inspected.

“I use cannabis specifically to treat ADD.”

Max Simon, CEO of Green Flower, a California-based cannabis education and training platform, says he’s a daily consumer of the plant’s extract. Every morning before work and again right after lunch, he takes 3-5 mg of a pure THC tincture that also contains MCT (medium chain triglycerides) oil, and he microdoses with tinctures throughout the day.

Read more at  https://qz.com/work/1693831/how-cannabis-ceos-use-weed-at-work/